Tuesday, 29 June 2010

The Motherless Invention. Buster Keaton. The Scarecrow

The Motherless Invention
Buster Keaton
The Scarecrow


Gilles Deleuze

Cinema 1
Cinéma 1

Ch X. The Action-Image: The Small Form
Ch X. L'image-action : La petite forme

3c.
The Paradox of Keaton the Minoring and Recurrent Functions of the Great Machines
Le paradoxe de Keaton : la fonction minorante et récurrente des grandes machines


Keaton makes machines his most precious ally because his character invents them and becomes part of them, machines 'without a mother' like those of Picabia. [...] The Scarecrow, where the single-roomed house 'without a mother' muddles each potential room with another, each cogwheel with another, stove and gramophone, bath and couch, bed and organ. [Deleuze, Cinema 1, 1986: 179d; 180a]

si Keaton fait des machines son allié le plus précieux, c'est parce que son personnage les invente, et en fait partie, machines « sans mère » à la manière de celles Picabia. [...] «L'épouvantail », où la maison sans mère, et d'une seule pièce, complique chaque pièce virtuelle avec un autre, chaque rouage avec un autre, réchaud et gramophone, baignoire et divan, lit et orgue [Deleuze Cinéma 1, 1985: 240a,b]


Gilles Deleuze & Félix Guattari

Capitalisme et schizophrénie 1 : L'Anti-Œdipe

Appendice:
Bilan-programme

pour machines désirantes



Les machines désirantes constituent la vie non-oedipienne de l’inconscient. Œdipe, gadget ou fantasme. Picabia nommait par opposition la machine « fille née sans mère ». Buster Keaton présentait sa machine-maison, dont toutes les pièces sont en une, comme une maison sans mère tout s’y fait par machines désirantes, le repas des célibataires (L’Epouvantail, 1920). [Deleuze & Guattari : 468b]

D'autres procédés de récurrence peuvent intervenir ou s'ajouter, comme l'enveloppement des parties dans une multiplicité (ainsi la machine-ville, ville dont toutes les maisons sont dans une maison, ou la machine-maison de Buster Keaton, dont toutes les pièces sont dans une pièce). [Deleuze & Guattari : 476cd]



[Clip should play, even though the screen is blank until the button is pressed.]

video


Deleuze, Gilles. Cinema 1: The Movement-Image.Transl. Hugh Tomlinson & Barbara Habberjam, London: Continuum, 1986.

Deleuze, Gilles. Cinéma 1: L'image-mouvement. Paris: Les éditions de minuit, 1983.


Deleuze, Gilles, & Félix Guattari. “Appendice: Bilan-programme pour machines désirantes.” Capitalisme et schizophrénie 1 : L'Anti-Œdipe. Paris : Les Éditions de minuit, 1972/1973.


Tuesday, 22 June 2010

Gun Machine. Buster Keaton. The High Sign


Gun Machine
Buster Keaton
The High Sign


Gilles Deleuze

Cinema 1
Cinéma 1

Ch X. The Action-Image: The Small Form
Ch X. L'image-action : La petite forme

3c.
The Paradox of Keaton the Minoring and Recurrent Functions of the Great Machines
Le paradoxe de Keaton : la fonction minorante et récurrente des grandes machines

The High Sign puts forward a bizarre abridgment of the causal series: a shooting machine in which the hero presses his foot on a hidden lever, so that a system of wires and pulleys brings down a bone which a dog tries to reach by pulling a cord so that the bell on the target rings (a cat is enough to throw the mechanism out of gear). [Deleuze, Cinema 1, 1986: 181a]

« The High Sign » propose un abrégé de série causale insolite : une machine à tir où le héros appuie du pied sur un levier caché, si bien qu'un système de fils et de poulies fait tomber un os, qu'un chien veut atteindre en tirant sur une corde, de manière à faire résonner la cloche de la cible (il suffit d'un chat pour détraquer la machine). [Deleuze Cinéma 1, 1985: 241cd]

[Clip should play, even though the screen is blank until the button is pressed.]

video


Deleuze, Gilles. Cinema 1: The Movement-Image.Transl. Hugh Tomlinson & Barbara Habberjam, London: Continuum, 1986

Deleuze, Gilles. Cinéma 1: L'image-mouvement. Paris: Les éditions de minuit, 1983.


Sunday, 20 June 2010

The Automatic Turn of the World. Joseph Mankiewicz. Sleuth


[The following is quotation. My notes are in red.]

The Automatic Turn of the World
Joseph Mankiewicz
Sleuth


Gilles Deleuze

Cinema 2: The Time Image
Cinéma 2: L'image-temps

Chapter III. From Recollection to Dreams: Third Commentary on Bergson
Chapitre III. Du souvenir aux rêves (troisième commentaire de Bergson)

2c: The two poles of the flashback: Carné, Mankiewicz
2c: Les deux pôles du flash-back : Carné, Mankiewicz


Two characters are eternal enemies, in a universe of automata; but there is a world where one of the two maltreats the other and forces a clown costume on him, and a world where the other takes on the dress of inspector and becomes master in turn, until the unleashed automata shuffle all the possibilities, all worlds, and all times (The Bloodhound [sic: Sleuth]) [Deleuze Cinema 2, 1989: 47d]

Deux personnages sont ennemis pour l'éternité, dans un univers d'automates ; mais il y a un monde où l'un des deux malmène l'autre et lui impose un costume de clown, et un monde où l'autre prend une tenue d'inspecteur, domine à son tour, jusqu'à ce que les automates déchaînés brassent toutes les possibilités, tous les mondes et tous les temps (« Le limier ») [Deleuze Cinéma 2, 1985: 69bc]


In its very essence, memory is voice, which speaks, talks to itself, or whispers, and recounts what happened. Hence the voice-off accompanies the flashback. In Mankiewicz this spiritual role of memory often gives way to a creature more or less connected with the beyond: the phantom in Mrs. Muir's Adventure, the ghost in Whispers in the City [sic. People Will Talk], the automata in Bloodhound [sic. Sleuth]. [Deleuze Cinema 2, 1989: 49b]

Dans son essence même elle est voix, qui parle, se parle ou murmure, et rapporte ce qui s'est passé. D'où la voix off qui accompagne le flash-back. Souvent chez Mankiewicz ce rôle spirituel de la mémoire fait place à une créature plus ou moins liée à l'au-delà : la fantôme de «L'aventure de Mme Muir », le revenant de « On murmure dans la ville », les automates du «Limier ». [Deleuze Cinéma 2, 1985: 71b]


[The young man in this story is arranging with the old man to peaceably take the older man's wife off his hands. The old man uses this predicament to play a humiliating trick on the young man. But then later, it is the young man who turns the tables. He explains that he killed the old man's mistress and hid her body somewhere on the premises. He arranged for the police to come that night, and gave the authorities the impression that the old man had killed her. The old man has fifteen minutes to find the hidden evidence that would incriminate him. To discover each, he must solve a riddle that will lead him to these murder clues. The young man continues to torture him with this urgent hunt. There is even a clue that is hidden in one of the automata. But in the end, this was all just a game of humiliation now played on the old man. It turns out the young man told the police not about the murder, but about the original game. So the police might visit the old many anyhow on that account. But the old man could not live with the humiliation, and shoots the young man as the police arrive.]

[Videos should play, despite showing no image until the play button is pressed.]

video

video

video

video








Deleuze, Gilles. Cinema 2: The Time Image. Transl. Hugh Tomlinson and Robert Galeta. London & New York: 1989.

Deleuze, Gilles. Cinéma 2: L'image-temps. Paris:Les éditions de minuit, 1985.



Monday, 7 June 2010

Visions Rarefied. Alfred Hitchcock. Spellbound


Visions Rarefied
Alfred Hitchcock
Spellbound


Gilles Deleuze

Cinema I: The Movement Image
Cinéma 1: L'image-mouvement

Ch 2.
Frame and Shot, Framing and Cutting
Cadre et plan, cadrage et découpage

1a.
The first level frame, set, or closed system
Le premier niveau : cadre, ensemble ou système clos


The highest degree of rarefaction seems to be attained with the empty set, when the screen becomes completely black or completely white. Hitchcock gives an example of this in Spellbound, when another glass of milk invades the screen, leaving only an empty white image. [Deleuze, Cinema 1, 1986: 14a]

Le maximum de raréfaction semble atteint avec l'ensemble vide, quand l'écran devient tout noir ou tout blanc. Hitchcock en donne un exemple dans « La maison du Dr Edwards », quand un autre verre de lait envahit l'écran, ne laissant qu'une image blanche vide. [Deleuze Cinéma 1, 1985: 24a]


Cinema 2: The Time Image
Cinéma 2: L'image-temps

Ch.3.
From Recollection to Dreams: Third Commentary on Bergson
Du souvenir aux rêves (troisième commentaire de Bergson)

3b: From the Optical and Sound Image to the Dream-Image
3b: De l'image optique et sonore à l'image-rêve
(3d: Ses deux pôles : René Clair et Bunuel)


Sometimes the dream-images are scattered throughout the film, in such a way that it is possible to reconstitute them in their totality. thus, with Hitchcock's Spellbound, the real dream does not appear in the Daliesque paste and cardboard sequence, but is shared between widely separated elements: these are the impressions of a fork on a sheet which will become stripes on pyjamas, to jump to the striations on a white cover, which will produce the widening-out space of a washbasin, itself taken up by an enlarged glass of milk, giving way in turn to a field of snow marked by parallel ski lines. A series of scattered images which form a large circuit, of which each one is like the virtuality of the next that makes it actual, until all return together to the hidden sensation which has all the time been actual in the hero's unconscious, that of the lethal toboggan. [Deleuze Cinema 2, 1989: 55bc]

Il arrive que les images-rêve soient disséminées le long du film, de manière à pouvoir être reconstituées dans leur ensemble. Ainsi, avec « La maison du Dr Edwardes » d'Hitchcock, le vrai rêve n'apparaît pas dans la séquence en carton-pâte de Dali, mais est distribué en éléments distants : ce sont les raies d'une fourchette sur une nappe qui deviendront rayures d'un pyjama, pour sauter dans les stries d'une couverture blanche, qui donnera l'espace évasé d'un lavabo, repris lui-même par un verre de lait grossi, livrant à son tour un champ de neige marqué par des traces parallèles de ski. Série d'images disséminées qui forment un grand circuit, dont chacune est comme la virtualité de l'autre qui l'actualise, jusqu'à ce que toutes ensemble rejoignent la sensation cachée qui n'a jamais cessé d'être actuelle dans l'inconscient du héros, celle du toboggan meurtrier. [Deleuze Cinéma 2, 1985: 79a]


[Here are the lines-on-white images. The milk image is included here.]

[Videos should play when the button is pressed, even though they show no image until then.]

video


[And here is the Dalí dream sequence].

video








Deleuze, Gilles. Cinema 1: The Movement-Image.Transl. Hugh Tomlinson & Barbara Habberjam, London: Continuum, 1986

Deleuze, Gilles. Cinéma 1: L'image-mouvement. Paris: Les éditions de minuit, 1983.


Deleuze, Gilles. Cinema 2: The Time Image. Transl. Hugh Tomlinson and Robert Galeta. London & New York: 1989.

Deleuze, Gilles. Cinéma 2: L'image-temps. Paris: Les éditions de minuit, 1985.