Wednesday, 24 June 2009

The Camera's Face. Bergman. Summer with Monika

presentation by Corry Shores

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The Camera's Face


Gilles Deleuze

Cinema I

Chapter 5

The Perception Image

Section 2

Griffith and Eisenstein

It is transparent, translucent or white space that has just been defined. Such a space retains the power to reflect light, but it also gains another power which is that of refracting, by diverting the rays which cross it. The face which remains in this space thus reflects a part of the light, but refracts another part of it. From being reflexive, it becomes intensive. Here there is something unique in the history of the close-up. The classical close-up ensures a partial reflection in so far as the face looks in a direction different from that of the camera, and thus forces the spectator to rebound on the surface of the screen. We are also familiar with very fine ‘camera-looks’, as in Bergman’s Summer with Monika, which establish a total reflection and give the close-up a distance which is proper to it. (Cinema 1, 97a)


video



Deleuze, Gilles. Cinema 1. Transl. Hugh Tomlinson & Barbara Habberjam, London: Continuum, 1986







Monday, 15 June 2009

For Whom the Bell Shoots, Hawks, El Dorado, Empty Church Function

presentation by Corry Shores

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[The following is quotation]


For Whom the Bell Shoots


Gilles Deleuze

Cinema I

Chapter 10:
The Action-Image
The Small Form

Section 2a:
The Western in Hawks: functionalism

featuring

Howard Hawks

El Dorado


First of all, the locations lose the organic life which encompassed them, traversed them and situated them in a set: the purely functional prison in Rio Bravo does not even need to show us its prisoner; the church in El Dorado no longer bears witness to anything but an abandoned function; the town of Rio Lobo is reduced to 'a diagram, now only showing functions, a bloodless town condemned by the weight of a past'. (169d, emphasis mine)


video


Deleuze, Gilles. Cinema 1. Transl. Hugh Tomlinson & Barbara Habberjam, London: Continuum, 1986.


Image from: http://thisdistractedglobe.com/wp-content/uploads/2006/09/El%20Dorado4.jpghttp://thisdistractedglobe.com/wp-content/uploads/2006/09/El%20Dorado4.jpg